10 Words That Have Different Meanings In Southern States

Advertisement

hungry_yett / cafeaugustus1930 / ameliaharn / Instagram

Advertisement
Advertisement

It’s no surprise that people from the South have a vernacular unlike the rest of the country. Although we all live in the same country, we use some words differently based on where we grew up.

There is a long list of very common words that have multiple meanings. So, we compiled a list of words that pull double duty that we use on an almost daily basis. We’ve included what the word means in the South, and how everyone else in the country uses it.

Advertisement

Both definitions are right, but the Southern definition is more right, just sayin’!

Let’s take a look!

Sugar

In the South: A kiss

View this post on Instagram

Meeting baby sis for the first time💕

A post shared by Brittany Aldean (@brittanyaldean) on

Everywhere Else: A sweet-tasting ingredient in food. Ex: Pure Cane Sugar, brown sugar, etc.

Dressing

In the South: A bread based side dish most people will serve on Thanksgiving

Everywhere else: Condiment you put on salad

Tea

In the South: Sweetened iced tea

Everywhere: Unsweetened black iced tea

 

Fixing

In the South: When you are getting prepared to do something

Everywhere Else: Something you do when something is broken

Buggy

In the South: A shopping cart

View this post on Instagram

Tarjé 🎯

A post shared by Amelia ♥️ (@ameliaharn) on

Everywhere Else: A horse-pulled mode of transportation

Coke

In the South: Any carbonated beverage

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by @the_hungry_travelator on

Everywhere Else: Coca-cola

Barbecue

In the South: Slow-cooked meat that goes well with barbecue sauce (ex. pulled pork, brisket)

Everywhere Else: Grilling hot dogs and burgers in the backyard

Goober

In the South: Peanuts

Francesco Carta fotografo / Getty Images

Everywhere else: A goofball

Greens

In the South: Cooked collard greens

Everywhere else: Salad, or green vegetables

Ugly

In the South: Misbehaving, spiteful rudeness

Everywhere else: A person who is not attractive

Do you say any of these words? Are there any we missed? Let us know in the comments!

In the meantime, watch Reese Witherspoon explain some Southern slang below.

×

Like Us on Facebook!